After Thanksgiving

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So much fun to make some of these. And not difficult at all. The Creamy Turkey Tetrazzini may be the most difficult, although you probably have most of the ingredients left-over from Thanksgiving in the refrigerator, except maybe for the mushrooms. If you don’t have Cream Sherry, use a good white wine that is slightly sweet, yet bold.

Creamy Turkey Tetrazzini

Creamy Turkey Tetrazzini

 

Crumble Scrapple with Meadowlard Farms Poached Eggs Acme Bakeshop Toasted Sourdough Fresh Raspberries and Blueberries

Crumbled Scrapple with Meadowlark Farms Poached Eggs
Acme Bakeshop Toasted Sourdough
Fresh Raspberries and Blueberries


 

Split Pae and Ham Soup

Split Pea and Ham Soup

And here is the recipe for the Split Pea and Ham Soup that we made for the Williamson Orchards and Vineyards New Tasting Room Open House. It was superb and made from Idaho products – Ham Hock, Split Peas, Heirloom Carrots, Onions, Celery, stock and herbs.

Feast of the Seven Fishes


Some information and recipes for the Feast of the Seven Fishes. Enjoy!

Boise Foodie Guild

OK. We have posted about Hanukkah and a while back about Kwanza and several other culturally diverse holidays. And it seems that this year, I have been hearing a lot about the Italian Christmas Eve celebration of the Feast of the Seven Fishes. As it turns out, there is quite a bit written about the feast, usually held on Christmas Eve. “The Feast of the Seven Fishes is an Italian Christmas celebration. Today, it is a feast that typically consists of seven different seafood dishes. However, some Italian-American families have been known to celebrate with nine, eleven or thirteen different seafood dishes. This celebration commemorates the wait, the Vigilia di Natale, for the midnight birth of the baby Jesus. It is unclear when the term “Feast of the Seven Fishes” was popularized.” (Wikipedia) And according to Mario Batali on Epicurious.com, “”It’s what Italians do when they say they’re fasting.”…

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Thanksgiving 2016

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26Feb2016_1_Sushi-Joy_Robin_Right-FacingAnd a great day it was! Dinner finished almost on time. Marnie, Chris and Anna joined us. The turkey tuned out fantastic – the first time I have done a spatchcock turkey and it was awesome. Veggies roasted great. Turkey was moist, tender and delicious. I took several pictures on my phone – 3 – of the dinner plated, Marnie and Robin and Chris and Anna, but they never appeared on my phone. They’re out in La-La land somewhere. Here, though, are some photos of preparing the dinner and maybe I’ll make a photo of the plated dinner – at least close to it. Cheers – This was really fun to do!

Getting the Bacon Wrapped Dates ready. Stuffed with Chopped Almond.

Getting the Bacon Wrapped Dates ready. Stuffed with Chopped Almond.

Dates ready for the oven.

Dates ready for the oven.

Mushroom Stuffed Puff pastry.

Mushroom Stuffed Puff Pastry.

Finished product.

Finished product.

Turkey has been spatchcocked (backbone removed) and sitting on heirloom root vegetables - carrot, parsnips and onion - to keep the turkey off the bottom of the pan.

Turkey has been spatchcocked (backbone removed) and sitting on heirloom root vegetables – carrot, parsnips and onion – to keep the turkey off the bottom of the pan.

Cooking in the oven at 400 degrees F. This after 1 hour. One more hour to go for a 14 lbs turkey.

Cooking in the oven at 400 degrees F. This after 1 hour. One more hour to go for a 14 lbs turkey.

Plated Turkey Robin's Cranberry Sauce Dried Corn Wilted Lettuce Roasted Heirloom Vegetables Stuffing Cups Mashed Potatoes and Gravy throughour. 2006 and a 2006 Indian Creek Winery (ID) Pinot Noir

Plated

Spatchcock Turkey
Robin’s Cranberry Sauce
Dried Corn
Wilted Lettuce Salad
Roasted Heirloom Vegetables
Stuffing Cups
Mashed Potatoes and Gravy throughout
2006 and a 2008 Indian Creek Winery (ID) Pinot Noir

Skillet Apple Pie

Skillet Apple Pie

These wines were available for dinner. We only had the oldest one on the left.

These wines were available for dinner. We only had the oldest two on the left. Super paring and wines.

In order to do a dinner like this, one needs to make a "schedule of events". Thursday, I also made a schedule like this hour-by-hour.

In order to do a dinner like this, one needs to make a “schedule of events”. Thursday, I also made a schedule like this hour-by-hour.

Korean BBQ Beef


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Well, I thought this BBQ was good, but then, I like grilled meats. The recipe is in the file above, if you want it. Takes about 2 days, counting the marinating time. Very short to grill on a screaming hot grill.

The beef

The beef

Marinating

Marinating

Grilling

Grilling

Plated with a dipping sauce and sautéed Bok choy.

Plated with a dipping sauce and Sautéed Bok Choy.

Oktoberfest at The Buzz


Good German dinner and wine and beer at the Buzz for Oktoberfest!

Treasure Valley Food and Wine Blog

10Nov2015_1e_The-Buzz-Monthly_Blind-Tasting_Buzz-InsideA good, adventuresome wine dinner at The Buzz celebrating Oktoberfest. Roulade. Beer. Wine. Carmel Beer Ice Cream. And the ice cream that Cristi made was rich and smooth and delicious!! Keep it on the menu, Cristi!!! We took a culinary tour, as well as a wine tour and beer tour, through some of Germany. For instance, “…Schnitzel can be made with different types of meat. Jäger-Schnitzel – with mushroom sauce; Zigeuner-Schnitzel is a sauce of red peppers,mushrooms, onions, tomato paste, red wine and chicken broth; Cordon Bleu came from Switzerland and is a schnitzel stuffed with ham and cheese.” These are just a few of the culinary discussions we had.

One of the better wines for the evening. [19] I know, it's not German. One of the better wines for the evening. [19] I know, it’s not German.

Pretzels and Pork Schnitzel Meatballs 2014 Julia James Pinot Noir. a13% alc. an OK wine. the Snake River Pakitos IPA went better, though

Pretzels and Pork Schnitzel Meatballs
2014 Julia James Pinot Noir
13% alc. an OK wine.[16]
Snake River Pakitos IPA went better, though [18]

Greens with Radish and Cucumber Salad 2014 Urban Riesling 9.5% alc [15] Humboldt Low and Easy Lager was a better paring

Greens with Radish…

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Tournedos with Creamed Spinach

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captains-shack_2I saw this recipe this morning and really thought it looked interesting. Tournedos with Creamed Spinach. The recipe comes from Rachael Ray, but we have adapted it somewhat. I have also placed some fairly deep information on the recipe. Here is some of that info.

  1. Note: Tournedos are: A beef tenderloin, known as an eye fillet in Australasia, fillet in France, the United Kingdom, South Africa and Germany, is cut from the loin of beef.
  2. tournedos-rossini-1 Tournedos Rossini (pictured here) is a French steak dish, perhaps created for the composer Gioachino Rossini by French master chefs Marie-Antoine Carême or Adolphe Dugléré, or by Savoy Hotel chef Auguste Escoffier. The dish comprises a beef tournedos (filet mignon), pan-fried in butter, served on a crouton, and topped with a hot slice of fresh whole foie gras briefly pan-fried at the last minute. The dish is garnished with slices of black truffle and finished with a Madeira demi-glace sauce.
  3. Demi-glace (English: “half glaze”) is a rich brown sauce in French cuisine used by itself or as a base for other sauces. The term comes from the French word glace, which, used in reference to a sauce, means icing or glaze. It is traditionally made by combining equal parts of veal stock and espagnole sauce, the latter being one of the five mother sauces of classical French cuisine, and the mixture is then simmered and reduced by half.
    Common variants of demi-glace use a 1:1 mixture of beef or chicken stock to sauce espagnole; these are referred to as “beef demi-glace” (demi-glace au boeuf) or “chicken demi-glace” (demi-glace au poulet). The term “demi-glace” by itself implies that it is made with the traditional veal stock.
  4. Espagnole sauce: The basic method of making espagnole is to prepare a very dark brown roux, to which veal stock or water is added, along with browned bones, pieces of beef, vegetables, and various seasonings. This blend is allowed to slowly reduce while being frequently skimmed. The classic recipe calls for additional veal stock to be added as the liquid gradually reduces, but today water is generally used instead. Tomato paste or pureed tomatoes are added towards the end of the process, and the sauce is further reduced.
  5. Auguste Escoffier King of Chefs 1846-1935.
    Auguste Escoffier, “The Chef of Kings and The King of Chefs,” was born in the Riviera town of Villeneuve-Loubet, France, on October 28, 1846. His career in cookery began at the age of 12 when he entered into apprenticeship in his uncle’s restaurant, in Nice…a French chef, restaurateur and culinary writer who popularized and updated traditional French cooking methods. Much of Escoffier’s technique was based on that of Marie-Antoine Carême, one of the codifiers of French haute cuisine, but Escoffier’s achievement was to simplify and modernize Carême’s elaborate and ornate style. In particular, he codified the recipes for the five mother sauces. Referred to by the French press as roi des cuisiniers et cuisinier des rois (“king of chefs and chef of kings”—though this had also been previously said of Carême), Escoffier was France’s preeminent chef in the early part of the 20th century.
    Alongside the recipes he recorded and invented, another of Escoffier’s contributions to cooking was to elevate it to the status of a respected profession by introducing organized discipline to his kitchens.
    Escoffier published Le Guide Culinaire, which is still used as a major reference work, both in the form of a cookbook and a textbook on cooking. Escoffier’s recipes, techniques and approaches to kitchen management remain highly influential today, and have been adopted by chefs and restaurants not only in France, but also throughout the world.
  6. And finally, a really great source book for every kitchen is the The Sauce Bible: Guide to the Saucier’s Craft by David Paul Larousse

Here are some other variations on Tournedos Rossini. Look at the variations and then add your own. Have fun. Enjoy!
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Notice the black truffles in this one - same as pictured above.

Notice the black truffels in this one – same as pictured above.

Anyone with any ideas of getting veal bones to make veal stock in the Boise area, please let me know. Just remember, I have meds to get next month. Cheers!

Make Your Own Sauerkraut!

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captains-shack_2Not at all difficult to make. It just takes some prep time, about an hour or so; a clean crock for fermenting the cabbage, there are really nice ones online; fresh cabbage, this is the perfect time of year to get some great cabbage from your local Farmers Market; a good recipe and many are available. Here is our recipe for Sauerkraut and you can modify this anyway you want to make it “yours”. Recipes, like dance routines, are only suggestions. The recipe listed here is also on permanent file in the Boise Foodie Guild Recipes listed above. Here is the process that I use. In the final photo, I seal the cabbage from air by (1) Covering the top of the cabbage with uncut cabbage leaves and not plastic, and (2) Make sure the water seal on the top of the crock is always full. At times, you will hear that kraut “perking”. It is fermenting when that happens – a good thing! Robin bought me this crock several years ago online. It is awesome! See the safety tips below.

Shredding the cabbage using a mandolin. See tghe belnd of red and white cabbage. 4 heads of white cabbage to 2 medium heads of red cabbage. Nice color blends.

Shredding the cabbage using a mandolin. See the blend of red and white cabbage. 4 heads of white cabbage to 2 medium heads of red cabbage. Nice color blends.

The shreeddedd cabbage in the crock. See the recipe for the spices I use. There are only 4.

The shredded cabbage in the crock. See the recipe for the spices I use. There are only 4.

Uncut cabbage leaves are placed on top of the shredded cabbage. Note the "water trough" on the edge of the crock. The top lid fits right in this "trench" and seals the mash from air.

Uncut cabbage leaves are placed on top of the shredded cabbage. Note the “water trough” on the edge of the crock. The top lid fits right in this “trench” and seals the mash from air.

Finally, weights - these came with the crock - are placed on the leaves to hold the cabbage under the liquid that forms. The idea is to keep the cabbage submerged and out of any air.

Finally, weights – these came with the crock – are placed on the leaves to hold the cabbage under the liquid that forms. The idea is to keep the cabbage submerged and out of any air.

Here are some great safety tips when making sauerkraut, or any fermented vegetables. Sauerkraut Fermentation Gone Bad. And from the site listed in the link,

Three Basic Fermentation Rules
1) Keep it Salty! Weigh your cabbage and vegetables to ensure you add the correct amount of salt to create a 2% brine. The correct numbers are 1 3/4 pound vegetables for 1 tablespoon salt OR 5 pounds vegetables for 3 tablespoons salt. Remember, these weights include not just the cabbage, but any vegetables and seasonings you’re mixing with the cabbage.
2) Keep it Under the Brine! Use some type of weight to keep fermenting cabbage and vegetables submerged, especially during the first 7-10 days when the microbial climate of your jar is established. Put on a lid to keep out the air! Fermenting is an anaerobic process.
3) Keep it Clean! No, you don’t need to sterilize equipment or use bleach, just make sure your tools, fermentation vessels and weights are thoroughly washed and well rinsed.

Williamson Orchards and Vineyards New Tasting Room


New tasting room opening at Williamson Orchards and Vineyards!

Treasure Valley Food and Wine Blog

Yea! Great to see that the Williamson Orchards and Vineyards new and beautiful tasting room in the heart of the Snake River AVA will be opening soon. Real soon! Here is a link to Williamson Orchards and Vineyards where you can find more information.

08oct2016_1a_tvws_williamson-group“The farm was homesteaded in 1909 by Lillian (Williamson) and George Gammon. These pioneers set a precedent of hard work, ingenuity and perseverance. The Williamson’s were some of the first to plant fruit trees in the Sunnyslope valley. As the family grew, so did the business. Four generations of Williamson have worked the farm.
Today Williamson Orchards and Vineyards is operated by Michael, Beverly and Patrick Williamson [pictured here]. The original homestead of 80 acres expanded up to 700 acres at one time, and currently consists of 400 acres of vineyards, orchards and row crop.
We planted our first vineyards in 1998 and released our first…

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The Buzz October Wine Dinner


Yum dinner and party coming up!

Treasure Valley Food and Wine Blog

Aero Vin at the Buzz

The Buzz is having a different kind of wine dinner this month. To celebrate Oktoberfest, they are including beer and wine to go with the dinner. This should really be a fun evening for everyone. Make sure,l though, that you make a reservation by calling The Buzz at (208) 344-4321. We usually go on Tuesday evening, so see you there!

beer-and-wine-dinner

You’re invited!
Join us for our October Wine Dinner

We will be focusing on beer and wine for the dinner this month. Bring a friend on October 11 or 12 at 6:30 PM for a fun night of food, beer, and wine
Meal sample, not necessarily the one being served. Meal sample, not necessarily the one being served. We’ll have a four course dinner with beer and/or wine with each course.
Don’t miss the fun and festivities.
Cost is $20.00 per person
Reservations are sure to fill up fast!
Call us to book your table now at (208)…

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Harvest Time at Parma Ridge Winery


Lots of excitement at Parma Ridge Winery this weekend – the first weekend of Fall. It’s harvest time!

Treasure Valley Food and Wine Blog

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Yes indeed it is! And you can help if you let them know and soon! That can be good time. A “working” time. But fun. Here is the latest from Stephanie. Enjoy.

Join us for wonderful wine, fabulous food and an amazing view!

Enjoy this weekend with wine tasting and excellent cuisine with your friends and family at Parma Ridge. We are open Friday, 12-9 p.m., Saturday 12-5 p.m. and Sunday 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. with our regular menu all weekend long. We have Happy Hour on Friday evening from 4-7p.m. and Sunday Brunch Specials. Reservations are recommended if dining on the patio or in the tasting room Friday evening or Sunday for Brunch.

It’s HARVEST time at Parma Ridge – We will begin harvesting our first batch of grapes on Tuesday, September 27. We’ve had a number of people offer to help, so for those of you interested…

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